General Education

LEH300-LEH301 - Fall 2007 - Section Titles & Descriptions

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LEH300 Courses

LEH300
LEH300 01 0836 Madden, Brian Suffering and the Human Response [Taught with PHI 365]
LEH300 02 0832 Newman, Zelda Women in the Bible
LEH300 03 0833 Newman, Zelda Satire, Humor and Reverence: Yiddish Classics in English Translation
LEH300 04 0834 Saint-Just, Sophie Independent Films: Reading Cinematic and Literary Texts
LEH300 05W 0835 Cash, Jeremy Leisure and Recreation in a Multicultural Society
LEH300 06 2954 Hayat, Muhammed Capitalism and Democracy
LEH300 07 3015 Gallo, Marcia Sexuality and Sex Roles in Transnational Perspective
LEH300 08 3051 Gallo, Marcia Contemporary Global Feminisms
LEH300 09 0818 Araia, Ghelawdewos Politics and Cultures of African Peoples in Africa and the Diaspora
LEH300 10 DeSimone, Janet Ethics and Decision Making in Literature and Film
LEH300 11 Saint-Just, Sophie Independent Films: Reading Cinematic and Literary Texts
LEH300 B01W 0810 Quarrell, Susan Widows and Maids: Medieval Images of Women in Chaucer’s "The Canterbury Tales"
LEH300 B02W 0831 Sula, Chris Evolution and Ethics: How Psychology and Biology Matter to Morality [w/ PHI365]
LEH300 C01W 0811 Salmanova, Ekaterina The Mystery of St. Petersburg: Literature, Art, Film
LEH300 D01W 0812 Salmanova, Ekaterina The Mystery of St. Petersburg: Literature, Art, Film
LEH300 D02W 2952 Anderson, James Jazz and the Improvised Arts
LEH300 E01 0815 Frangos, John Epidemic Disease in History: From Plague of Athens to the Plague of Aids
LEH300 G01 0816 Decker, Corrie Developing Africa:  Race, Sex and Welfare
LEH300 G02W 0817 Frangos, John Contexts of Conflict: International Crises since WWII
LEH300 H01W 0819 Brownson, Carl Immortality: Pictures of the Afterlife [w PHI365]
LEH300 ONA1W 0820 Carroll, Mary Girls Interrupted
LEH300 ONA2w 0821 Quarrell, Susan Widows and Maids: Medieval Images of Women in Chaucer’s "The Canterbury Tales";
LEH300 ONA3W 0822 Viano, Bernado Mexican Muralism: Revolution and Other Universal Themes
LEH300 ONA5W 0823 Piccolomini, Manfredi Birth of the Renaissance in Florence
LEH300 ONA6W 0824 Piccolomini, Manfredi Birth of the Renaissance in Florence
LEH300 ONA7W 0825 McCarl, Clayton Poets, Priests, Painters, Punkers: Voices of Dissent in Latin America
LEH300 ONA8W 3016 McCarl, Clayton Poets, Priests, Painters, Punkers: Voices of Dissent in Latin America
LEH300 P01 0826 Choplet, Nadeige Madness and Modernism
LEH300 P02W 0827 Shahidi, Samina The New American Memoir
LEH300 P03W 2958 Rosen, Marjorie Movie Heroines in a Changing World
LEH300 Q01 0828 Mozes, Daniel Modernism
LEH300 Q02 0829 Garral, Michael Art for the Masses
LEH300 R01 1638 Joyce, Regina A Tale of Two Forces: Religion and Global Politics
LEH300 R02W 1639 Shahidi, Samina Muslim Women: Images and Social Roles
LEH300 R03 1640 Sanchez, Julette History, Memory and the Black Atlantic:  Transnational Reflections
LEH300 XH81W 1641 Gantz, David Theism, Atheism, and Existentialism [Taught with PHI 365]
LEH300 XM81W 1642 Cash, Jeremy Leisure and Recreation in a Multicultural Society
LEH300 XM82W 0837 Carey, Roz
Educating Kings and Citizens [Taught with PHI365]

LEH301 Courses

LEH301
LEH301 01 0857 Joyce, Regina Latin America: The Violent Children of Cain
LEH301 02W 0858 Hodge, Jean Women & Minorities in Film and Literature
LEH301 03 0859 Renshon, Stanley Immigration and National Identity
LEH301 04 0860 Blot, Richard Language in America
LEH301 05W 2953 Quintana, Alejandro Caudillos: "Benevolent" Dictators in Latin America?
LEH301 06 1652 Kaczinsky, Charles “Real to Reel”: New York Immigration in Film
LEH301 B01W 0861 Brown, Tammy African American Art, Identity, and Politics:1920-2007
LEH301 C01W 0862 Khalid, Robina Brother from Another Planet: African-American Science Fiction
LEH301 C02w 0839 Esdaile, Lisa Black Women and Their Texts
LEH301 C03w 2955 Colburn, Forrest Travel, Memory, and Memoir in the Americas
LEH301 D02w 0841 Sanchez, Julette New York City and the Lively Arts
LEH301 E01 0843 Boone, Ralph W "Common Sense" vs Tyranny and Superstition
LEH301 F01W 2961 Valentine, Robert Images of the American Civil War
LEH301 G01 0842 Hyman, David Teaching the Superman: The Superhero Narrative and American Culture
LEH301 G02W Robertson, Margaret American Gothic: Literature, Architecture, Film
LEH301 H01W 0845 Cyrille, Dominique Black Dance, Identity & Body Politics in the Caribbean
LEH301 H02W 0846 Sanford, Victoria Human Rights in Latin America
LEH301 ONA1W 0848 Hall, Polly Politics, Culture, and Human Rights
LEH301 ONA2W 0849 Hall, Polly American Environmental Policy
LEH301 ONA4W 0850 Lahey, Miriam American Approaches to Disability: Changing Contexts and Concepts
LEH301 ONA5 0851 Gersh, Sheila Using Multimedia to Visualize American Culture
LEH301 ONA6W 0852 Driver, John Globalization and American Media
LEH301 ONH1W 2956 McCoy, Rita Wrongly Convicted: Doing Time Without Doing Crime
LEH301 P01W 0853 Suchma, Phillip Sport and the American City
LEH301 P02W 0854 Johnson, Geoff Hip Hop and the Urban Crisis
LEH301 Q01W 1646 Perry-Ryder, Gail Black Popular Culture
LEH301 Q02 1647 Blot, Richard Language in America
LEH301 R01W 0855 Esdaile, Lisa The African-American Detective in Film and Fiction
LEH301 R02 1648 Glasser, Marilynn "Americans at Play: Defining a National Character through Leisure"
LEH301 R03 2957 Badillo, David Explorations in Latino History and Sociology
LEH301 XH81W Ihara, Rachel Periodical Culture and the Making of America
LEH301 XM81 1651 Schulman, Jason “American Protest, Politics and Popular Culture
LEH301 XM82W 2962 Valentine, Robert The American Revolution: Film and Fact
LEH301 XM83 2794 Johnson, Geoff Hip Hop and the Urban Crisis
LEH301 XT81 2963 Badillo, David Explorations in Latino History and Sociology
LEH301 XT82 2795 Harmon, Gregory Slavery and New York, 1600-1890
LEH301 XT83 2964 Murphy, Denis From the Old World to the New: The Irish-American Experience
LEH301 XW81 2796 Zierler, David Environmental Issues in War and Peace
LEH301 XW82 2797 Kaczinsky, Charles “Real to Reel”: New York Immigration in Film
LEH301 ZM01W 3076 Williams, Stacey The Black Image: From Caricature to HipHop Mass Marketing

LEH300-LEH301 - Fall 2007 - Section Titles & Descriptions

LEH300.01
0836
F 9:30 - 12:00
Madden, Brian

Suffering and the Human Response [Taught with PHI 365]
That suffering is a part of human existence, none would deny. There is a sense in which every area of human inquiry conducts itself with an eye to this problem. For the purposes of this course, we will explore how the question of suffering is presented and addressed in the works of artists, poets, philosophers and theologians. We will examine paintings by Grunewald, Gericault, and Picasso; explore tragedies by Sophocles and Shakespeare; and consider the problem of suffering as it is addressed in Buddhist and Epicurean philosophical works and in the Book of Job. The aim of this course, in part, will be to foster a greater understanding of the diverse ways in which the problem of suffering has been described, while also providing an opportunity to explore the breadth of human resources that have been employed in the effort to confront this problem.

LEH300.02
0832
T-TH 2:00 - 3:15
Newman, Zelda

Women in the Bible
Crossing the disciplines of literature, history and women's studies, this course will examine the different roles of women in the Bible.We will begin with some of the stories in Genesis that speak of the early people of Israel, and end with the woman-prophetess who speaks of the destruction of the kingdom and temple of Judah.

LEH300.03
0833
W 3:30 - 6:00
Newman, Zelda

Satire, Humor and Reverence: Yiddish Classics in English Translation
In this course we will read the stories of Sholem Aleikhem, a gentle humorist, Mendele Mokher Sforim, a biting satirist, and Y. L. Peretz, a writer whose approach was one of deep reverence.The stories will range from portrayals of Jewish life in Eastern Europe, to the early years of Jewish immigrant life in the US.

LEH300.04
0834
F 1:30 - 4:00
Saint-Just, Sophie Indies:Reading Cinematic and Literary Texts from the Americas and Beyond
The advent of independent films has paralleled the emergence of voices from oppressed minority groups. This interdisciplinary introductory course explores discourses of cultural affirmation and contestation through the lenses of independent films (indies) but also through poems, short stories, and theories from the English, Spanish, and French-Speaking Americas, with an emphasis on the variegated historical experiences of the African Diaspora but not exclusively.   We will look at the way independent filmmakers and authors from the Caribbean have contributed to discourses on American identities in poems and short stories. For instance, we will delve into the cultural process of Creolization when we examine how the interaction between poor African-American and Caribbean (English and Spanish-speaking) youth gave birth to Hip-Hop in the South Bronx in the 1970s (in documentaries such as Wild Style and Style Wars and in an article by Juan Flores. Then we will discuss the way the recent documentary Hip-Hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes queries misogyny and sexual identity.
LEH300.05
0835
F 9:00 - 11:30
Cash, Jeremy Leisure and Recreation in a Multicultural Society
This course will examine the diverse cultures which make up the American Landscape.Culture will be examined using leisure as its theme and starting point.Similarities as well as differences between culture will be identified.Folktales, proverbs, riddles, holidays, rituals and games from around the world will be presented and discussed.
LEH300.06
2954 F
1:30 - 4:00
Hyat, M.

Capitalism and Democracy
The course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to examining the relationship between capitalism and democracy. In this respect, writings in political science, sociology and economics will layout possible ways in which capitalism and democracy relate to each other. Inspired by the framework in a famous lecture by Gabriel Almond, the course examines writings that conceptualize positive as well as negative relationships between democracy and capitalism. Does capitalism support or subvert democracy? Alternatively, what are some ways and conditions in which democracy supports and/or subverts capitalism? The answers to these larger questions are sought through theoretical discussions and with the aid of the case study method. Authors to be examined include Albert Hirschman, Joseph Schumpeter, Barrington Moore Jr., Robert Dahl, Peter Berger, Seymor Martin Lipset, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, Charles E. Lindblom, Milton Friedman, James Buchanan, Mancur Olson, Peter Flora and A.J. Heidenheimer.

LEH300.07
3015
SA 9:00-11:40

 

Gallo, Marcia Sexuality and Sex Roles in Transnational Perspective
What is the relevance of gender and sexuality to the study of world histories and cultures?Using nonfiction and fiction writings, poetry, film, music and art, we will explore the changing meanings of sexuality and sex roles in relationship to demography, migration patterns, technology, economy, religion/spirituality, and family and other cultural forces.We will trace the development of sexual politics in specific societies in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe and the Americas; we will also explore how the study of sexuality offers opportunities to re-think major themes in world history.
LEH300.08
3015
SA 1:00 -3:40
Gallo, Marcia Contemporary Global Feminisms
"Contemporary Global Feminisms” will introduce students to global feminisms. Drawing on historical as well as current sociological, geopolitical, and artistic sources, we will explore the evolution of gendered cultural norms and efforts to advance gender equality in the 20th and 21st centuries. We will rely on nonfiction, fiction, poetry, biography and memoir for our reading materials; we also will incorporate documentary films and music.
LEH300.09
0818
T-Th 4:00 - 5:15
Araia, Ghelawdewos Politics and Cultures of African Peoples in Africa and the Diaspora
The objective of this course is to introduce students to the basic tenets of politics and culture of the people of African descent in Africa and the Diaspora.The course begins by examining the concepts of politics and culture and their ramifications, and in due course of class discussion, students will explore specific cultures of particular African, Latin American and Caribbean societies.  By doing so students will encounter group dynamics that make society with a characteristic way of life or culture – and in the macro sense, a system of values and norms – in relation to which people are organized according to status and role, and this whole fabric systematically linked together by networks of communication in the context of political systems and governance.
LEH300.10
M 3:00 - 5:30
DeSimone, Janet Ethics and Decision Making in Literature and Film
Through literature and film, this writing-intensive course will examine decision making as a process and the ethical dimensions inherent in making choices that significantly impact the lives of others. Emphasis will be placed on decision-making strategies.
LEH300.11
T-Th 4:40 - 5:55
Saint-Just, Sophie

Independent Films: Reading Cinematic and Literary Texts
The advent of independent films has paralleled the emergence of voices from oppressed minority groups. This interdisciplinary introductory course explores discourses of cultural affirmation and contestation through the lenses of independent films (indies) but also through poems, short stories, and theories from the English, Spanish, and French-Speaking Americas, with an emphasis on the variegated historical experiences of the African Diaspora but not exclusively. We will look at the way independent filmmakers and authors from the Caribbean have contributed to discourses on American identities in poems and short stories. For instance, we will delve into the cultural process of Creolization when we examine how the interaction between poor African-American and Caribbean (English and Spanish-speaking) youth gave birth to Hip-Hop in the South Bronx in the 1970s (in documentaries such as Wild Style and Style Wars and in an article by Juan Flores. Then we will discuss the way the recent documentary Hip-Hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes queries misogyny and sexual identity.

LEH300.B01W
T-Th 9:30 - 10:45
Quarrell, Susan Widows and Maids: Medieval Images of Women in Chaucer’s "The Canterbury Tales"
All moral theories hold some picture of human nature. At the dawn of the twenty-first century, it’s clear that this picture must fit within theories of how we think and how we’ve evolved. But how exactly do cognitive psychology and evolutionary biology matter to morality? Do they help ethical theories by proving the existence of innate moral responses and prosocial tendencies? Or do they call into question the very possibility of ethics by upsetting our beliefs about moral reasoning and justification? Are evolved tendencies even relevant to morality, or do they simply present us with obstacles to overcome? These are the questions we will consider as we read classic texts in theoretical ethics (e.g., Hume, Kant, Nietzsche), cutting-edge empirical psychology (e.g., Joshua Greene, Jesse Prinz, Jonathan Haidt), and recent evolutionary biology (e.g., Richard Dawkins, Frans de Waal, Sarah Blaffer-Hrdy). Topics will include altruism, egoism, moral development, skepticism, and the role of reason and emotion in moral judgment. No background in philosophy or (social) science is required.
LEH300.B02W
0831
T-TH 9:30 -10:45
Sula, Chris

Evolution and Ethics: How Psychology and Biology Matter to Morality [w/ PHI365]
All moral theories hold some picture of human nature. At the dawn of the twenty-first century, it’s clear that this picture must fit within theories of how we think and how we’ve evolved. But how exactly do cognitive psychology and evolutionary biology matter to morality? Do they help ethical theories by proving the existence of innate moral responses and prosocial tendencies? Or do they call into question the very possibility of ethics by upsetting our beliefs about moral reasoning and justification? Are evolved tendencies even relevant to morality, or do they simply present us with obstacles to overcome? These are the questions we will consider as we read classic texts in theoretical ethics (e.g., Hume, Kant, Nietzsche), cutting-edge empirical psychology (e.g., Joshua Greene, Jesse Prinz, Jonathan Haidt), and recent evolutionary biology (e.g., Richard Dawkins, Frans de Waal, Sarah Blaffer-Hrdy). Topics will include altruism, egoism, moral development, skepticism, and the role of reason and emotion in moral judgment. No background in philosophy or (social) science is required.

LEH300.C01W
0811
T-TH 11:00-12:15
Salmanova, Ekaterina

The Mystery of St. Petersburg: Literature, Art, Film
Conceived as an embodiment of European progress, St. Petersburg nonetheless witnessed barbaric cruelty. This course will investigate the city’s two sides: dark and cruel, bright and inspiring. We will study the works of literature (Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Akhmatova, Brodsky and others), art (Zubov, Patterson, Dobuzhinsky) and film (“October”, “Autumn Marathon”, etc.), connected with the city, as well as some of its historical and architectural features. The course will reveal the relatedness of these different subjects, examine how they reflect reality, and analyze the development of the image of a modern city.

LEH300.D01W
0812
T-TH 12:30 - 1:45
Salmanova, Ekaterina

The Mystery of St. Petersburg: Literature, Art, Film
Conceived as an embodiment of European progress, St. Petersburg nonetheless witnessed barbaric cruelty. This course will investigate the city’s two sides: dark and cruel, bright and inspiring. We will study the works of literature (Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Akhmatova, Brodsky and others), art (Zubov, Patterson, Dobuzhinsky) and film (“October”, “Autumn Marathon”, etc.), connected with the city, as well as some of its historical and architectural features. The course will reveal the relatedness of these different subjects, examine how they reflect reality, and analyze the development of the image of a modern city.

LEH300.D02W
2952 T, TH 12:30 - 13:45
Anderson, James

Jazz and the Improvised Arts
A history of jazz music from New Orleans to New York is coupled with an examination of improvisation in the arts.The class will investigate form and free creativity as applied to jazz, music from around the world, the visual arts, drama, and literature.

LEH300.E01
0815
M-W 8:00-9:15
Frangos, John

Epidemic Disease in History: From Plague of Athens to the Plague of Aids
Epidemic disease has been present throughout man's history and has had a profound effect on people and events.The purpose of this course is to examine these biological agents, their impact on history and society's responses, ranging from magic and religion to science, medicine, and the institution of the modern hospital.The course, in a topical format, ranges from prehistory to the present and presents disease's impact on history as well as the human response.

LEH300.G01
0816
M,W 11:00-12:15
Decker, Corrie

Developing Africa:  Race, Sex and Welfare
This course will explore historical themes leading up to the emergence of the development discourse about Africa in the twentieth century. Rather than a history of development as such, we will investigate the connections between colonialism, gender, and notions of progress in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries that set the stage for the post-WWII development debates on Africa. Topics for discussion will include development as a discourse, the “civilizing mission”, scientific racism, urbanization, poverty, education, public health, nutrition, maternity and social welfare.

LEH300.G02
0817
M,W 11:00-12:15
Frangos, John Contexts of Conflict: International Crises since WWII
After providing a background of WWII and the Cold War, this course focuses on trouble spots around the world including Latin America, Asia, the Middle East and Africa where we discuss the specific background and current situation (i.e.-the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the crisis between India and Pakistan, the gulf wars I and II).
LEH300. H01W
0819
M-W 12:30-1:45
Brownson, Carl

Immortality: Pictures of the Afterlife [w PHI365]
This course will examine portrayals of the afterlife from an interdisciplinary perspective, focusing on accounts from religious thought, philosophical thought, the visual arts, and literature. We will address the following questions, among others: Is an afterlife possible, and if so, how likely is it that one exists? What parts of us would have to survive to say that 'we' survived death- our minds? Our bodies? Why do visual representations of the afterlife have the features that they do? (Why do angels have wings and demons have horns, for example?) Are any versions of the afterlife morally unjustified, regardless of our behavior in this life, or morally required to make up for this life? Is it rational to shape our beliefs and actions by looking towards the afterlife? How would we respond if we knew that there was no afterlife? Would eternal life be increasingly boring, or infinitely interesting?Is death something to fear?

LEH300. ONA1W
0820
FM9/5 Wed 6-7
Carroll, Mary

Girls Interrupted
In novels, poems, short stories and films, we will look at how girls grow up, with an emphasis on the obstacles that get in their way. Women and girls have a particular task in fiction. All too often they must negotiate their way through a man's world. In some works that idea is explicit and in others it is implied. Our writing and discussions will focus on who these characters are, what they want, what's in their way and how they succeed (or not) in getting what they want. The selections chosen for the course will remind us that interruptions exist in many cultures.

LEH300. ONA2W
0821
FM9/5 Wed, 5-6 PM
Quarrell, Susan

Widows and Maids: Medieval Images of Women in Chaucer’s "The Canterbury Tales"|
T
he Middle Ages, despite the pervasive presence of a gloomy repressive church, was a period of immense social change and lively discourse. At the center of this discourse is Geoffrey Chaucer—considered by many to be the father of English Literature. In this course we will examine the Middle Ages and the images of medieval women that emerge as portrayed by Chaucer in his work The Canterbury Tales. We will explore elements of history, economics, sociology, and psychology represented by such figures as the Prioress, Griselda (the Clerk’s Tale), and the Wife of Bath, discovering the tensions inherent in the progress of women in medieval society. Discussions of women in the Taleswill touch upon the question of whether women are good or bad—modeled on either the Virgin Mary or Eve. Students will gain an understanding of the influence of gender on individual behavior, as well as on contemporary institutions of marriage, workplace, and church.

LEH300. ONA3W
0822
FM9/5, Wed, 4-5PM
Viano, Bernado

Mexican Muralism: Revolution and Other Universal Themes
This course explores the interaction of a national, public art (mural painting) and a social event (the Mexican Revolution 1910). Diego Rivera, David Alfaro Siqueiros and Jose Clemente Orozco, among others, created world-famous murals; their themes are universal, but two dominate: the experience of the Mexican Revolution and the concern of the place of human kind within the 20th century. The Revolution left its indelible mark on Mexican narrative as well; thus, we will read two novels that have something in common with the structure and thematic of muralismo mexicano.

LEH300. ONA5W
0823
FM9/5, Wed, 4-5
Piccolomini, Manfredi Birth of the Renaissance in Florence
This course examines the revival of all aspects of classical learning, both humanistic and scientific, that took place in Florence at the beginning of the Renaissance. It will concentrate both on the literary and political revolutions of the time, as well as on the influence of the rediscovered principles of Euclidean geometry in the development of perspective in painting and the creation of the maps that led to great geographical discoveries. The goal of the course is to show how the Renaissance, especially as it developed in Florence, was at the basis of the modern world.
LEH300. ONA6W
0824
FM9/5, Wed, 5-6:00
Piccolomini, Manfredi Birth of the Renaissance in Florence
This course examines the revival of all aspects of classical learning, both humanistic and scientific, that took place in Florence at the beginning of the Renaissance. It will concentrate both on the literary and political revolutions of the time, as well as on the influence of the rediscovered principles of Euclidean geometry in the development of perspective in painting and the creation of the maps that led to great geographical discoveries. The goal of the course is to show how the Renaissance, especially as it developed in Florence, was at the basis of the modern world.

LEH300. ONA7W
0825 FM

McCarl, Clayton Poets, Priests, Painters, Punkers: Voices of Dissent in Latin America
This course will consider how official narratives have been questioned during 500 years of Latin American history. In doing so, we will examine a panorama of materials, including poetry, narrative literature, essays, visual art, music, political manifestos, historical and critical studies. We will consider how these documents challenge political and economic structures, class and gender dynamics, and conventional notions of racial, ethnic, and national identity. No knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is required. This is a writing-intensive course, and students will be required to conduct complete numerous informal and formal writing assignments.

LEH300. ONA8W
3016 FM

McCarl, Clayton Poets, Priests, Painters, Punkers: Voices of Dissent in Latin America
This course will consider how official narratives have been questioned during 500 years of Latin American history. In doing so, we will examine a panorama of materials, including poetry, narrative literature, essays, visual art, music, political manifestos, historical and critical studies. We will consider how these documents challenge political and economic structures, class and gender dynamics, and conventional notions of racial, ethnic, and national identity. No knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is required. This is a writing-intensive course, and students will be required to conduct complete numerous informal and formal writing assignments.
LEH300. P01
0826
M 14:00-16:30
Choplet, Nadeige

Madness and Modernism
The Modernist Revolution is unique because it did not establish a new order. The similarities between madness and modernism are striking: defiance of the authority, nihilism, extreme relativism, distortions of time,strange transformations of self, and much more. During this semester we will underline the affinities between schizophrenia and modernism through the work of such writers and artists as Virginia Woolf, Kafka, Beckett and the Cubists, the Dadaist, the Surrealists and Picasso. We will also consider the ideas ofphilosophers including Nietzsche, Heidegger, Foucault and Derrida.

LEH300. P02W
0827
M 2:00-4:30
Shahidi, Samina

The New American Memoir
This course examines four memoirs that explore American identity though the lenses of political theory, race construction and literary aesthics. In Another Bulls*** Night in S**k City, acclaimed poet and author Nick Flynn examines his estranged father’s homelessness in Boston during the 1970’s. Through startling and experimental literary device, Flynn writes about his search for his own on the streets as a social worker in a homeless shelter. Lipstick Jihad is Iranian American journalist Azadeh Moaveni’s smart and sexy interrogation of the political, cultural and social negotiations that Iranian Americans and Iranians make as citizens in both countries as their governments struggle towards reasonable dialogue. Anne du Cille in elegant and thorough language traces the intersections of gender, race, class and politics in “Skin Trade”, a compelling personal and academic essay on growing up with Barbie as an African American girl during the Vietnam War. These personal narratives achieve a double ness of internal and external reflection of what it means to be American.

LEH300. P03W
2958
M 2:00-4:30
Rosen, Marjorie

Movie Heroines in a Changing World
The goal of this course is to understand how patriarchal attitudes toward women, love, and various notions of beauty, youth, and marriage and happily-ever-after endings provided the underpinnings for movies from the very beginning, and influenced women along the way.

LEH300. Q01
0828
T 2:00-4:30
Mozes, Daniel

Modernism
We are surrounded by images and we gather information from visual sources constantly. But how do we know what visual representations are saying to us? What is an image and how do they work? What is visual literacy? How do we “read” pictures? How do we compose information in a visual format? In this course, we will look at the role of images in constructing our understanding of the world. We will also think about images as a means of manipulating the truth. Ranging from children’s picture books to high art to photography and film, this course will look at visual representation in the disciplines, in our art forms, and in our everyday reality. Students will be asked to consider the role of images and visual information in their own fields of study and in the world around them. We will develop and exercise our skills in visual rhetorical analysis by looking at visual images and reading essays about visual images.

LEH300. Q02
0829
T 2:00-4:30
Garral, Michael

Art for the Masses
What is Art?What are the standards for deciding?That which we experience as beautiful?What is Beauty?That which we judge to be tasteful?What counts as tasteful, and to what extent is taste objective? Or “classy”?Or ethical (or not)?This course examines these and other longstanding questions in aesthetics – but it does so through a unique discussion of the nature and possibility of…“Mass Art” – which came of age in the 20th-century and is still with us in the music and movies of our day. In the first half of the course, we shall read and discuss accounts by such theorists as Adorno, Benjamin, McCluhan, Carroll and Cavell – cultural theorists focused on the arts.In the second half, we shall apply the theoretical insights won in the first half to a number of case studies from different mediums, e.g., theatre, opera, and especially movies by the contemporary Spanish director, Almodovar, which manifestly blur the distinction between “high” and “low” art. Throughout both its theoretical and applied parts, the course aims to combine various disciplines, including Philosophy, Literature, Theatre, Communications and Art History.

LEH300. R01
1638
Th 2:00-4:30
Joyce, Regina

A Tale of Two Forces: Religion and Global Politics
A focus on globalization and religious encounters, examined through film and text, as two actors exerting new forces on 21st century forms of statecraft, anarchy, and morality. Examples of different religions’ impact in countries at varying levels of economic and political development will be analyzed and trends in international political economy and contemporary world politics will be discussed.

LEH300. R02W
1639
TH 2:00-4:30
Shahidi, Samina

Muslim Women: Images and Social Roles
The figure of the Muslim Woman emerges from a particular historical contemporary moment in which she is invoked to support various ideological positions. In example, the oppression of women under the Taliban regime was cited as a significant reason for the recent US invasion of Afghanistan. In roughly the same time period of September 2004, France passed a school policy that social critics contend have violated the rights of girl students to veil in one of Europe’s oldest democracies. In this course we will examine and compare Muslim Women in various mainstream representations and self representations and explore the various layers of gendered meaning and reality communicated by these interpretations. Of particular focus will be historical, aesthetic and literary self representation through the intellectual histories of African, Egyptian and Nigerian women scholars Dr. Leila Ahmed, Nana Asma’u, and Dr. Amina Wadud. We will also engage experimental visual art texts by Zenib Sedira and Jehane Noujaim. We’ll read memoir excerpts of Iranian judge and Nobel Peace Prize recipient Shirin Ebadi and Iranian American journalist Azadeh Moaveni. We’ll also look at examples of mass media including the recently televised Canadian comedy “Little Mosque on the Prairie”, the discussion around Indian tennis player Sania Mirza, British comedienne Shazia Mirza and Nuyorican/Def Jam poet Suheir Hammad. Reading and Writing Intensive.

LEH300. R03
1640
Th 2:00-4:30
Sanchez, Julette

History, Memory and the Black Atlantic:Transnational Reflections
One of the many legacies of the Atlantic Slave Trade is the condition of an unquenchable desire for memory and undeniable yearning to belong.At best, what is left is a fragmented history and the haunts of the voices of ancestors who scream their silent testimonies.So, how do we negotiate a past that insists on a place in our present? Do we sum it up as a mere historical blip on the screen of humanity? Do we engage in a myopic sort of examination, and lose sight of larger implications? Or, do we look at the fact of the middle passage as a kind of starting point from which to create specific realities? Many writers and scholars have addressed these very issues in their work in often engaging and provocative ways.In this seminar, we will look at the works of several authors and filmmakers who give voice to the witnesses of this triangular trade route in an attempt to understand this shared heritage.We will also examine how these reflections might be critiques of modernity and transnationalism. Our readings may include: Phillips, Caryl. Atlantic Sound; Hartman, Saidiya.  Lose Your Mother:  A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route; Northrup, David.  The Atlantic Slave Trade.

LEH300. XH81W
1641
Th 6:00-8:40
Gantz, David

Theism, Atheism, and Existentialism [Taught with PHI 365]
Existentialism is one of the most important intellectual movements of the 20th century but the foundations of this philosophy can be found in the writings of the 19th century thinkers, Nietzsche and Kierkegaard. This course will begin with an analysis of Nietzsche and Kierkegaard and how their thoughts influenced two strands of existentialism - theistic and atheistic existentialism and what this implies for the human condition in the modern world. How can we discover meaning when the gods have abandoned us? What does it mean to have genuine faith and responsibility in a meaningless world? These and other themes will be examined through the work of a variety of philosophers and writers including Nietzsche, Kiekegaard, Dostoyevsky, Heidegger, Camus, Sartre, Buber and Richard Wright.

LEH300. XM82W
0837
M 6:00-8:40
Carey, Roz

Educating Kings and Citizens [Taught with PHI365]
Aristotle wrote that ideas about education most properly belong to the discipline of political theory. In America alone, in the last few decades, we have seen how political and politicized schooling has become, from which books and topics a school should adopt to the content of the local elementary school's holiday program. But this is not new; societies and philosophers in them have been devoting attention to what and how and by whom children and young adults should be taught since Plato wrote the Republic over 2,000 years ago. Today's debates over feminism, traditionalism, ethnocentrism, religion, etc., in education, merely echo what has come before. We will explore treatises on education to see how past thinkers answered these essential questions:  which members of society should be educated and what do they need to know? 

LEH301. 01
0857
Fri 1:00-3:30
Joyce, Regina

Latin America: The Violent Children of Cain
This course will provide an overview into Latin American violence emphasizing the complexity of repression and rebellion in this region’s history. Rosenberg in Children of Cain states “that one doesn’t necessarily have to be pathological to do horrible things. but rather this belongs to the society.” If society contains the answer, this course will consider a wide range of texts trying to not only understand the origins of violence in Latin America but also the point where global history enters into this equation. Themes of postcolonial mindsets and behavioral patterns, reflecting current political and economic relationships will emerge and the role of certain social movements will be examined.

LEH301. 02W
0858
Tu, Th 2:00-3:15PM
Hodge, Jean

Women & Minorities in Film and Literature
The uniqueness of women and minorities in film from early 1900-present.   We will examine the images, impact, messages and how they affect women and ethnic groups, including questions of gender bias, race and ethnicity.What unique contributions have women and people of color made in film? Has politics had any bearing on the roles played by women and minorities in film? The issue of stereotypes will also be confronted, in an attempt to comprehend recurring distortions in characteristics.Finally, we will look at the depiction of women and minorities on the screen and analyze how their characters might serve as valuable tools for stimulating sensitivity. In this writing intensive course, film viewing will be necessary in order to discuss various essays and texts. This writing intensive course will combine film study, literature, political science and history in examining works that includes, David Wark Griffith’s “The Birth Of A Nation,” Emil Jannings “The Blue Angel,” and Akira Kurosawa’s “Ikiru.” 

LEH301. 03
0859
W 3:30-6:00
Renshon, Stanley

Immigration and National Identity
What does it mean to be an American? Large -scale immigration since 1964 has made this country more diverse that it has ever been. But the question remains: What holds America together? Is there something distinctive about national identity and citizenship in the United States? If so, what is it?Is it a matter of culture, beliefs, or something else? Is citizenship the same as "being an American?" How do immigrants fit into American identity? Is a national identity useful, or even possible, in an age of globalization? There are many questions to ask, and this course will examine them.

LEH301. 04
0859
W 11:00 - 1:40
Blot, Richard

Language in America
Study of the place of language (the “struggle for voice”) in the forming of American identities. The course draws on the disciplines of linguistics (especially sociolinguistics), history, sociology, anthropology, political science (legal studies), and literary studies.

LEH301. 05W
2953
Tu, Th 4:00-5:15
Quintana, Alejandro

Caudillos: "Benevolent" Dictators in Latin America?
Using historical, literary, political science and journalistic approaches, this writing-intensive course analyzes the phenomenon of caudillismo—broadly understood as a political system dominated by a type of benevolent dictator, known in Latin America as “caudillo.”People in Latin America have found often themselves disappointed with democracy, perceiving it as a weak political system easily manipulated to serve the interests of oligarchs or plutocrats.This has created a favorable climate for caudillos to emerge as heroes capable of eliminating the corruption, greed and other ills found in imperfect national political systems. Indeed, after the impressive return of democracy to Latin America during the 1980s, some countries in the hemisphere are now curtailing democratic institutions to favor “benevolent” dictators.However, time and again caudillo-led dictatorships have demonstrated themselves to be a sour medicine with worse side effects than the original illness found in democracy.By focusing on the problems of caudillismo, this course emphasizes the importance of democratic governments, imperfects as they may be.

LEH301. 06
2953
SU 1:00-3:30PM
Kaczinsky, Charles

“Real to Reel”: New York Immigration in Film
This course will examine the history of immigration to New York City and its depiction in popular films.By examining the historical record within the framework of cinematic representations of immigration, students will confront issues of historical accuracy versus creative license.Along with comparing “real” immigration to “reel” immigration, students will analyze the films as historical artifacts of the time in which they were produced, recognizing how the films exhibit the attitudes and assumptions commonly held about immigration at particular points in American history.

LEH301. B01W
0861
Tu, Th 9:30-10:45
Brown, Tammy

African American Art, Identity, and Politics:1920-2007
This course charts how African-American artists have used literary, visual, and performance media to explore what it means to be black in America.Assignments include reading, listening, and viewing artwork produced from 1920 until the present.Using rare audio and visual materials (e.g. music, photography, film, etc.), students will critically engage primary sources and will situate them in a broader political and historical context with assistance from the secondary readings.The main goal of this course is to demonstrate the dynamic role that artistic production has played in African-American representations of self, understanding of local communities, and constructions of international and transnational identities.

LEH301. C01W
0862

Tu, Th 11:00-12:15

Khalid, Robina

Brother from Another Planet: African-American Science Fiction
African-American science fiction writer Nalo Hopkinson asserts that "science fiction has always been a subversive literature" because it forces the reader to "think twice and thrice about a whole bunch of things in relation to each other: sexuality, race, class, color, history." These questions will animate our course: is there a distinct tradition of black speculative fiction? How might a culture that has, in Hopkinson's words, "been on the receiving end of the colonization glorified in some science fiction" negotiate and politicize the genre? Does black speculative fiction cause one, in fact, "to think twice and thrice" about race, class, and sexuality? We will begin with a general consideration of the fantastic in literature. Using supplementary materials from postcolonial and feminist theory, as well as a consideration of the traditions of travel writing and utopian/dystopian thought, we will look at how black writers, filmmakers and musicians have used speculative methods to defamiliarize our assumptions about "familiar" social issues. Texts may include writings by Pauline Hopkins, George Schuyler, W.E.B. Du Bois, Octavia Butler, Samuel Delany, Walter Mosley, Ishmael Reed, Jewelle Gomez, and Nalo Hopkinson.

LEH301. C02W
0839
Tu, Th 11:00-12:15
Esdaile, Lisa

Black Women and Their Texts
Set against a historical timeline, this course examines short stories and poems, as well as excerpts (e.g., the introduction to Deborah Gray White’s groundbreaking study of black female slaves).It begins with Lucy Terry Prince and Phyllis Wheatley, some Sojourner Truth speeches, and reads in its entirety Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861), as well as Nella Larsen’s Quicksand(1928), and Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Are Watching God(1937).Other writers include Gwendolyn Brooks, Lorraine Hansberry, Toni Cade Bambara, Toni Morrison, and Danzy Senna.The course will explore issues such as the feminization of poverty, notions of “allegiance” to either race or gender, and how these authors use these genres or styles of writing to articulate black women’s experiences.

LEH301. C03W
2955
Tu, Th 11:00-12:15
Colburn, Forrest

Travel, Memory, and Memoir in the Americas
This course will explore a trove of travel writing, across time periods and settings in the Americas. The focus will be on examining how travel--of different kinds, ranging from that of tourism to migration and exile--leads to self-discovery and conclusions about self and society.The reading will include the chronicle of a shipwrecked Spanish explorer, Cabeza de la Vaca, a memoir of growing up (and leaving) a small Caribbean island by Jamaica Kincaid, Che Guevara's "motorcycle diaries," and John Steinbeck's novel of migration from dusty Oklahoma to verdant California, "Grapes of Wrath." These stimulating readings promise to inform students about the scope of the world, and prompting them to think about how an individual's sense of place shapes his or her character. Students will be expected to write about their own experience.

LEH301. D02W
0841
Tu,Th 12:30-1:45

Sanchez, Julette

New York City and the Lively Arts
Between Van Cortland Park and Coney Island there is, probably, more artistic vitality than anywhere else in the world. It is a banquet and no Lehman student should miss the celebration. Students in this LEH 300 section will have seats at the head table. They will attend plays and performances right here on the Lehman campus. During class meetings, they will also have a chance to read about and discuss what they have seen. The end result should be a greater appreciation and understanding of New York's artistic riches.

LEH301. E01
0843
M,W 8:00-9:15AM
Boone, Ralph W

"Common Sense" vs Tyranny and Superstition
“These are the times that try men’s souls.”  With these lines from his pamphlet Common Sense, Thomas Paine rallied not only Washington’s defeated troops but also a dispirited nation.hat year Common Sense sold more copies than the bible.Thomas Paine is the first person to use the term, “The United States of America,” and it is often said that had Common Sense not been published the “Declaration of Independence” would not have come to pass.Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams all considered Thomas Paine the Founding Father of the Republic. “Why then is the name Thomas Paine not a household name? Why is there no national holiday celebrating his birthday?Why did Theodore Roosevelt angrily dismiss Thomas Paine as “a dirty little atheist?”In our search for answers we will read selections from Paine’s writings:Common Sense, The Crisis, and Rights of Man.We will then examine Age of Reason, the work that caused his name to be vilified and virtually stricken from the annals of American history.

LEH301. F01W
2961
M,W 9:30-10:45AM

Valentine, Robert

 

Images of the American Civil War
This course will examine the legacy of the Civil War and how it has been perceived in American culture from 1865 until the present day. Aspects of the "Lost Cause," the rise of Realism and the impact of Veterans' Organizations, the "Compromise" of the 1930s, post-1945 commercialism, the Centennial, the latter-day "re-enactment" culture, and the controversy over the Confederate flag will be covered. We will explore the perceptions of the War through fiction and film, analyze the impact of modern documentaries, and assess the importance of historic preservation and underwater archaeology. Prior knowledge of the American Civil War is beneficial to the understanding of these concepts.

LEH301. G01
2961
M,W 11:00-12:15PM
Hyman, David

Teaching the Superman: The Superhero Narrative and American Culture
In this course, we will deal with the mythic and cultural contexts of the superhero. Our main focus will be to trace the evolution of superhero narratives as an emerging tradition grounded in the literature and popular culture of the key eras of its history: the Golden Age of the late Thirties and World War II, ushered in by the birth of Superman; the Silver Age of the Marvel Superheroes and their soap-opera, character-driven dilemmas; and the mid-1980s eruption of the revisionary superhero graphic novels The Dark Knight Returns and Watchmen. Later narratives, such as Warren Ellis’ ongoing series Planetary and Neal Gaiman’s Sandman; films such as Unbreakable, The Incredibles, and Spiderman; television programs such as Heroes and Smallville; and the recent popularity of Japanese Manga and Anime will be studied as contemporary expressions of the genre. Course requirements include a midterm and final examination, a brief class presentation, and an ongoing reading response journal.

LEH301. G02W
M,W 11:00-12:15PM
Robertson, Margaret

American Gothic: Literature, Architecture, Film
This course explores the dark magic, madness, and mystery of the gothic form in America from the dawn of the nineteenth century to the present day through the literature, architecture, and films of some of its most famous artists. Short stories, poems, and excerpts of longer works by authors such as Washington Irving, Edgar Allen Poe, Emily Dickinson, William Faulkner, and Toni Morrison will be read. We will view several classic films in the gothic mode and examine important instances of the Gothic Revival in architecture and the decorative arts. Throughout our exploration of these works, the bright patina of American optimism will be contrasted with the corresponding American preoccupation with darkness and our fears of the unknown, the supernatural, the sexual, and the savage. The course offers students the opportunity to explore these issues both analytically and creatively, bringing their own cultural experiences of the gothic to the classroom.

LEH301. H01W
0845
M,W 12:30-1:45PM
Cyrille, Dominique

Black Dance, Identity & Body Politics in the Caribbean
The aim of the class is to get students accustomed to the notions of Caribbean dance and music as expressive arts. Students will be invited to reflect upon issues of performance and construction of identity across space and time in the Caribbean and Caribbean cities of the USA. Using audiovisual documents, past-century literature as well as more recent studies about dance as a starting point, we will examine how people from various ethnic background in the Caribbean and Caribbean cities of the USA define dance and notions of appropriateness about dance. From the "Touloulous' balls" in French Guyane or the Dominican "Quadrille" to Haitian "Rara" masqueraders and New York "On-2" salsa dancers, we will explore various styles of Black dance and musicmaking in the circum-Caribbean on order to discuss how feelings of identity, political and/or religious beliefs, etc. permeate an individual's choice of music and dance practice. Conversely, we will examine how the expressive arts contribute to identity formation and how they function as markers of socio-racial identity in the circum-Caribbean.

LEH301. H02W
0846
M,W 12:30-1:45PM
Sanford, Victoria

Human Rights in Latin America
This course provides an interdisciplinary overview of human rights (e.g., political, social, cultural and economic rights) and their abuses in Latin America.Child soldiers, urban gangs, street children, indigenous rights movements, coca grower movements, drug trafficking, human trafficking, government corruption, illegal land grabs, free trade zones, and rural to urban migration are among the issues affecting, challenging and shaping human rights in Latin America today.What happens when rights collide?Who decides which rights are valid?These questions and issues will be considered in the course as we examine rights issues from Mexico to Central America and the Caribbean,through the Andes and down to the Southern Cone.Professor Sanford has worked with the Guatemalan Forensic Anthropology Foundation on the excavation of clandestine cemeteries of massacre victims and taken testimonies from massacre survivors.  She is currently writing a book about child soldiers in Colombia.

LEH301. H02W
0848 FM

 

Hall, Polly

Politics, Culture, and Human Rights
This course introduces you to the intricate interplay between politics and culture surrounding the issue of human rights. We will explore the impact of American politics and culture on political and social institutions connected to the human rights field, and on international conflict and cooperation related to human rights. We will specifically examine universal (or political) principles declared in various human rights covenants and see how American cultural traditions resist the adoption of some of these principles. We will explore a variety of human rights case studies and compare American politics and culture to the different political and cultural approaches taken by other countries. Concepts of oppression, culture, and patriarchy will be explored to understand their social and political implications. Tensions between cultural traditions and human rights will be explored. Issues surrounding the international policy of sovereignty will be examined. This course will be taught from an interdisciplinary perspective, integrating theory and readings from political science, international politics, ethics, sociology, and anthropology.

LEH301. H02W
0849 FM
Hall, Polly

American Environmental Policy
American Environmental Politics captures the major issues and stakeholders in the shaping of environmental policy. We will examine how environmental problems are identified and how solutions are formulated and implemented. By addressing the historical roots of environmentalism, milestones in the development of key policies, and current problems and conflicts, we will explore the inter-complexity and importance of the field. In addition to understanding the domestic dimensions of environmental policy, we will also integrate an international perspective on environmental law and issues that require a global response.

LEH301. ONA4w
0850 FM: 9/6
Wed, 6-7:00
Lahey, Miriam

American Approaches to Disability: Changing Contexts and Concepts
A cultural history of disability in America, this course explores, using a case-study approach, the changing cultural experience of disability and traces the development of American disability law through selected landmark cases.

LEH301. ONA5
0851
FM: 8/29
Wed 7-8:00 PM

Gersh, Sheila

Using Multimedia to Visualize American Culture
This course is designed to use information technology and digital collections to support the teaching of American Culture. Through the study of culture, historic topics about America, general ideas about American culture, and specific aspects of American culture, students will gain a deeper understanding of America. Student investigation will produce educational “American CultureQuilt” websites from which others can learn.

LEH301. ONA6W
0852
FM: 9/6
Wed 5:00
Driver, John

Globalization and American Media
From humble origins in the late 1700’s, United States media evolved during the early twentieth century and became the foremost world exporter of content, both of a serious nature as well as entertainment. The trend continues, although global dominance of American media may be in question. As we examine the significant highlights in the evolution of American media -- from the newspaper to radio to television to the Internet -- we will take a parallel journey and examine the effects these innovations have had on the world and probe the influence, acceptance and lack of acceptance of US media on a global level. The course seeks to stimulate a better understanding of US and world culture through a study of American media in relation to their influence (both positive and negative) on the world. The course aims to provoke thought and an understanding of US media’s impact on the world and attempts to create an environment where students from diverse backgrounds can engage in discussion about the contemporary responsibilities and challenges that face American media. The course will also pose valuable questions about the future of media in the US and the world.  

LEH301. ONH1W
2956
S: 9/8, 10/13, 11/10, 12/8
McCoy, Rita

Wrongly Convicted: Doing Time Without Doing Crime
This course will explore how false confessions, misidentifications, law enforcement misconduct, incompetent lawyers, faulty science, unreliable informants and racism contribute to miscarriages of justice. Possible reforms that may safeguard against the conviction of innocent people will be evaluated and case studies of people who have been exonerated after conviction will be examined. This course will draw on current research in public policy, psychology, natural sciences, law, and criminal justice studies.

LEH301. P01W
0853
M 2:00-4:30
Suchma, Phillip

Sport and the American City
Sport – whether amateur or professional, recreational or competitive – holds a prominent place in our current American culture. The presence of sport in our lives is not limited, however, only to culture. Nowhere is this more obvious than in modern American city, where sport can be part of the economy, shape neighborhood development, and help communities form an identity.This course will take a socio-historical approach in examining the rise of our modern sporting culture and how it coincides with America becoming an urban nation.  Among the topics covered will be the rise of professional sports, participation based on ethnicity and social class, stadium construction, franchise relocation, and the impact of all of these topics on civic image and identity.

LEH301. P02W
0854
M 2:00-4:30
Johnson, Geoff

Hip Hop and the Urban Crisis
The course will be focused on post-WWII urban history -- American cities in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s -- and will also include the disciplines of music and sociology.Historians, sociologists, anthropologists and other scholars interested in urban phenomena often make reference to an "urban crisis" in the United States which begins in the mid-late 1960s and arguably continues down to the present day. In this course we will investigate the highly complex nature of the "urban crisis" and problematize the term in order to see how the very definition of "urban crisis" is multifaceted and contested. The course will begin by constructing a broad overview of post-WWII U.S. urban history, then turn to various aspects of the "urban crisis" during the last few decades.The class will draw on a wide variety of readings from week to week including work by academic historians and sociologists, cultural criticism, and primary sources such as newspaper articles (there will be several required texts, but much of the reading will come in the form of handouts).Another key point of entry into our discussion of the urban crisis will be music, specifically hip-hop.In the thematic section of the course we will spend part of each class period listening to and discussing hip-hop songs which offer insight into aspects of American urban history.Hip-hop music and culture will not only serve to better illuminate the urban crisis in the United States, we will also consider ways in which hip-hop itself is both part of the urban crisis and simultaneously a source of possible solutions to problems in American cities.

LEH301. Q01W
1646
T 2:00-4:30
Perry-Ryder, Gail

Black Popular Culture
This course examines the folk idiom and evolution of African American culture past and present as reflected in the creative works of black artists in the areas of film, music, sports, and language.  Examples are drawn from each of these areas to demonstrate the continuity of these images across artistic domains. Emphasis given to the relationship between historical and contemporary representations of the African American image across different genres of mass media.

LEH301. Q02
1647
T 2:00-4:30
Blot, Richard

Language in America
Study of the place of language (the “struggle for voice”) in the forming of American identities. The course draws on the disciplines of linguistics (especially sociolinguistics), history, sociology, anthropology, political science (legal studies), and literary studies.

LEH301. R01W
0855
Th 2:00-4:30
Esdaile, Lisa

The African-American Detective in Film and Fiction
This course will focus on the black detective in film and fiction, looking at how black writers (and directors and actors) transformed a genre that initially excluded blacks, as well as women, because of their supposed lack of rationacinative skills.

LEH301. R01W
1648
Th 2:00-4:30
Glasser, Marilynn

Americans at Play: Defining a National Character through Leisure
Leisure experience from pre-colonial times to the present day, with emphasis on the role of leisure behaviors in the development and expression of American identity. Topics include cultural diversity; women's leisure; role of sport and government; the outdoor experience; the arts; media, popular culture and technology; consumerism and deviance.

LEH301. R03
1648
Th 2:00-4:30
Badillo, David

Explorations in Latino History and Sociology
This course includes national and global migration patterns, inter-group relations, and challenges of defining an identity among immigrants and their offspring from Latin America.Several assignments will require students to explore linkages between Latinos and other immigrant/ethnic groups with respect to language, religion, and culture.Readings, lectures, and media seek to develop critical awareness of contrasts and similarities among various Latino waves of migration since the early twentieth century, as well as comparisons of contemporary groups.Students will also learn to view the Bronx as a spatial and temporal laboratory for contemporary historical and sociological developments.

LEH301. XH81W
Th
6:00-8:40
Ihara, Rachel Periodical Culture and the Making of America
In this age of television, film, radio, and the Internet, it is easy to forget the importance of magazines to the history of American popular culture. In this course, we will address the role of American magazines by immersing ourselves in the world periodical print. We will begin by considering how scholars have attempted to make sense of magazines as polyvocal texts, identifying theoretical perspectives and methodologies to serve as guides. As a class, we will evaluate key moments in the history of American magazines, including the serial publication of William Dean Howells’s A Hazard of New Fortunes in Harper’s Magazine and Pauline Hopkins’s work for the Colored American Magazine. Finally, students will engage in their own explorations of periodical culture by addressing issues such as the development of an editorial perspective, the interaction of image and text, and the relationship between various texts within a given magazine.
LEH301. XH81W
1651
M 6:00-8:40
Schulman, Jason

American Protest, Politics and Popular Culture
This course will examine the impact of protest movements and politics on popular culture in American life in the 20th century. We will first focus on the rise of mass industrial trade unionism in the 1930s and 1940s, as exemplified by the Congress of Industrial Organizations, and the CIO's relations with the New Deal-era Democratic Party and the Communist Party USA. We will examine how the CPUSA helped build not only the CIO but a great array of organizations that impacted on every phase of American life, and how the party and its members influenced popular music, folk music, and Hollywood movies. We will then move through the "McCarthyist" 1950s to the 1960s, and scrutinize the relations between the Civil Rights and Black Power movements, the movement against the Vietnam War, and popular music and film.

LEH301. XM82W
2962
M 6:00-8:40
Valentine, Robert The American Revolution: Film and Fact
This course will examine the impact of film upon the historical interpretation of the American Revolution. A series of films on the American Revolution, from the silent era to the present, will be shown in order to assess their historical accuracy, film-making techniques, and overall compatibility for use by educators. Documentaries and other audio-visual material will also be presented and assessed.
LEH301. XM83
2794
M 6:00-8:40
Johnson, Geoff

Hip Hop and the Urban Crisis
The course will be focused on post-WWII urban history -- American cities in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s -- and will also include the disciplines of music and sociology. Historians, sociologists, anthropologists and other scholars interested in urban phenomena often make reference to an "urban crisis" in the United States which begins in the mid-late 1960s and arguably continues down to the present day.In this course we will investigate the highly complex nature of the "urban crisis" and problematize the term in order to see how the very definition of "urban crisis" is multifaceted and contested.The course will begin by constructing a broad overview of post-WWII U.S. urban history, then turn to various aspects of the "urban crisis" during the last few decades.The class will draw on a wide variety of readings from week to week including work by academic historians and sociologists, cultural criticism, and primary sources such as newspaper articles (there will be several required texts, but much of the reading will come in the form of handouts).Another key point of entry into our discussion of the urban crisis will be music, specifically hip-hop.In the thematic section of the course we will spend part of each class period listening to and discussing hip-hop songs which offer insight into aspects of American urban history.Hip-hop music and culture will not only serve to better illuminate the urban crisis in the United States, we will also consider ways in which hip-hop itself is both part of the urban crisis and simultaneously a source of possible solutions to problems in American cities.

LEH301. XT81
2963
T 6:00-8:40
Badillo, David

Explorations in Latino History and Sociology
This course includes national and global migration patterns, inter-group relations, and challenges of defining an identity among immigrants and their offspring from Latin America.Several assignments will require students to explore linkages between Latinos and other immigrant/ethnic groups with respect to language, religion, and culture.Readings, lectures, and media seek to develop critical awareness of contrasts and similarities among various Latino waves of migration since the early twentieth century, as well as comparisons of contemporary groups.Students will also learn to view the Bronx as a spatial and temporal laboratory for contemporary historical and sociological developments.

LEH301. XT82
2795
T 6:00-8:40
Harmon, Gregory

Slavery and New York, 1600-1890
This course is a historical survey of slavery as an institution in New York from 1620 to 1890.  The course will show slavery under the Dutch from 1620-1664, and the radical change once England took over in 1664.The students will gain a better appreciation for the geography of New York City. They will also learn how the growth of New York City’s economy was interwoven with the South’s slave economy. In addition students will learn about the abolitionist and an anti-abolitionist movements in New York which led to the abolishment of slavery in 1827 (which did not end the intimate economic relationship that New York had with the South). Finally the student will see how blacks in New York evolved from slaves to free men and women.

LEH301. XT83
2964
Tu 6:00-8:40
Murphy, Denis

From the Old World to the New: The Irish-American Experience
This course will trace the roots of the Irish emigrants who left for the New World of the United States in the nineteenth century. It will survey the Gaelic past from the mythology of Cuchualinn and Maeve in The Tain to the Golden Age, the conquest and the catastrophe of the Famine. From here the course will focus on the new urban Irish in the American city and the experience of the Irish west of the Mississippi. The course will be presented in the framework of the literature, history and culture of the Irish in the "American Experience."

LEH301. XW81
2796
W 6:00-8:40
Zierler, David

Environmental Issues in War and Peace
This course will examine the United States and international environmental politics. In the post-Cold War world, a new political consciousness and discourse has taken up such global problems as deforestation in the Amazon, ozone depletion over Antarctica, the destruction of wild tiger habitat in India, to name a few. These problems are part of a single continuum—ultimately these issues affect us all. This connectedness and the role of the US in the new environmental awareness are the central concern of this course.

LEH301. XW82
2797
W 6:00-8:40
Kaczinsky, Charles

“Real to Reel”: New York Immigration in Film
This course will examine the history of immigration to New York City and its depiction in popular films.By examining the historical record within the framework of cinematic representations of immigration, students will confront issues of historical accuracy versus creative license.Along with comparing “real” immigration to “reel” immigration, students will analyze the films as historical artifacts of the time in which they were produced, recognizing how the films exhibit the attitudes and assumptions commonly held about immigration at particular points in American history.

LEH301. ZM01W
3076
SA 12:00-2:45
Williams, Stacey

The Black Image: From Caricature to HipHop Mass Marketing
This course explores the history of reproduced portrayals of blacks from 19th-century caricatures in illustrated books and images of darkly colored domestics in advertising. The course will look at early studio postcards and anthropological photography that documented subjects' physical as well as scientific racial uniqueness. Around 1900, the W.E.B. DuBois' Negro Exposition displayed photographs of the Negro middle class. Marketing of the New Negro in black newspapers and magazines continued during the Harlem Renaissance, Garveyism, and black is beautiful movements. Questions of how the black image has survived in present versions dubbed by black entertainers and media masters, including grass roots and Hollywood Blaxploitation of the 70s until hip hop's contemporary sexually explicit videos will be examined in depth.Aside from the theme of visual image, the class will learn about the creative environments in which these images were created. Also included is the study of music, literature, theater, fashion, as well as, political trends in which any and all black images are integral.

Last modified: Oct 13, 2011