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Environmental, Geographic, and Geological Sciences

Courses

Course list

Geography

Human Geography

  • GEH 101: An Introduction to Geography. 3 hours, 3 credits.  
    A study of world physical/environmental and cultural patterns and the factors producing them. Maps and atlases are used to recognize and analyze these patterns.
  • GEH 102: World Regional Geography. 3 hours, 3 credits.
    A study of the basic features of each of the world's regions.
  • GEH 111: Geography of Business and Marketing. 3 hours, 3 credits.
    Analysis of location factors in business decision-making, including geographic techniques to locate and define potential markets and marketing campaigns. Evaluation of the market characteristics of neighborhoods, communities, and populations.
  • GEH 230: Human Geography. 3 hours, 3 credits.
    Study of the approach, key concepts, and methods of human geography.
    Emphasis will be given to the cultural landscape and location analysis within a systematic framework. The contribution of these concepts to an understanding of societal problems. Prerequisite: Either GEH 166, 167, or Departmental permission.
  • GEH 232: Medical Geography. 3 hours, 3 credits.
    Introduction to medical geography via a study of the way in which environments affect health and disease. Effect of the distribution of health facilities on community health and access to health services. Prerequisite: GEH 101, or instructor's permission.
  • GEH 235: Conservation of the Environment. 3 hours, 3 credits.
    The impact of human activities on natural resources and environmental quality. Topics will include soil, forests, water, wildlife, outdoor recreation, and energy resources.
  • GEH 240: Urban Geography. 3 hours, 3 credits.
    The contribution of geographical concepts and methods to an understanding of contemporary and future urban problems. Emphasis placed on the ghetto and the urbanized region in post-industrial societies.
  • GEH 242: Economic Geography. 3 hours, 3 credits.
  • GEH 245: Introduction to Quantitative Methods of Geography. 3 hours, 3 credits.
  • GEH 266: Geography of Development. 3 hours, 3 credits.
    An introduction to the spatial aspects of economic development. The course provides a basis for understanding the cultural, physical, and economic differences between the world's developed and underdeveloped regions. Prerequisite: GEH 101, GEH 102, or Departmental permission.
    GEH 267: The New York Metropolitan Region. 3 hours, 3 credits.
    An introduction to the way a geographer looks at the New York metropolitan region and its problems. Topics include the physical environment, population growth and distribution, housing and employment patterns, and transportation systems. Prerequisite: GEH 101, GEH 102, or Departmental permission.
  • GEH 270: Field Geography. 90 Hours (fieldwork and lab), 3 credits.
    Prerequisite: Either GEH 166, GEH 167, or Departmental permission. Note: For estimated costs and dates for registration and fieldwork, consult the Chair.
  • GEH 275: Field Geography of New York City and Vicinity. 90 hours (fieldwork and lab), 3 credits.
    (Spring semester, Saturdays only.) Prerequisite: GEH 166, GEH 167, or Departmental permission.
    GEH 281: Geography of the United States and Canada. 3 hours, 3 credits.
    The major features of the natural and human environments of the United States and Canada. Selected regions such as the East coast Megalopolis and the Great Plains. Prerequisite: GEH 101, GEH 102, or Departmental permission.
  • GEH 283: Geography of Western Europe. 3 hours, 3 credits.
    Prerequisite: GEH 101, GEH 102, or Departmental permission.
    GEH 285, 287, 289, and 291: Regional Geography of Selected Areas. Each 3 hours, 3 credits.
    The geography of continents or major areas outside Anglo-American and Western Europe. Special emphasis on the basic principles of economic and cultural geography of regionalization as illustrated in the area under consideration. Prerequisite: GEH 101, GEH 102, or Departmental permission.
  • GEH 285: Asia
  • GEH 287: Africa
  • GEH 289: Latin America (LAC 289)
  • GEH 291: Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Republics
  • GEH 293: Geography of New York State. 3 hours, 3 credits.
    Prerequisite: GEH 101, GEH 102, or Departmental permission.
  • GEH 315: Historical Geography. 3 hours, 3 credits.
    Prerequisite: Either GEH 166 or 167 and either GEH 181 or 183, or Departmental permission.
  • GEH 320: Population Geography. 3 hours, 3 credits.
    Prerequisite: Either one year's work in GEH or Departmental permission.
  • GEH 325: Political Geography. 3 hours, 3 credits.
  • Prerequisite: Either GEH 166, GEH 167, or one semester of POL.
  • GEH 330: The History of Geographic Thought. 3 hours, 3 credits.
  • GEH 335: Problems in Human Ecology. 3 hours, 3 credits.
    Prerequisite: GEH 235 or GEP 230.
  • GEH 340: Advanced Urban Geography. 3 hours, 3 credits.
    Prerequisite: Either GEH 240 or Departmental permission.
  • GEH 490: Honors in Geography.
    One semester, 2, 3, or 4 credits (may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits). Individual research, including reading and —in some areas —laboratory or field investigations, to be carried out under the individual guidance of a staff member. The results must be embodied in an honors essay or other suitable presentation. Prerequisite: Departmental permission.

Physical Geography

  • GEP 199: Cartography and Graphic Presentation I. 6 hours (2, lecture; 4, lab), 4 credits.
    Use of drawing instruments; free-hand and mechanical lettering in the construction of maps, diagrams, graphs, and charts. Elements of distance, direction, and position. Study of map projections and their use; construction of some simpler projections. Methods of enlarging and reducing maps; drawing of profiles and traverse made by students in the field. Practice in the transformation of data of various kinds into effective types of charts and graphs.
  • GEP 204: Basic Mapping: Applications and Analysis. 4 hours (2, lecture; 2, lab), 3 credits.
    An introduction to the world of maps—how to use, interpret, and analyze maps. History of cartography, map projections, scales, measurements, contour interpretations, thematic maps, charts and graphs, remote sensing, aerial photos, and geographic information systems.
  • GEP 205: Principles of Geographic Information Science. 4 hours (2, lecture; 2, lab), 3 credits.
    The use of Geographic Information Systems for conducting research and spatial analysis in the natural and social sciences. The use of computer mapping and spatial analysis technologies for studying the physical and human components of the earth's environment. Prerequisite: GEO 101, or GEH 101, or Departmental permission.
  • GEP 210: Introduction to Environmental Science. 3 hours, 3 credits.
    Overview of environmental systems, ranging from biological species and soil conservation to water and waste management.
  • GEP 226: Physical Geography. 5 hours (3, lecture; 2, lab), 4 credits.
    Introduction to physical geography, including basic earth-sun relationships, weather and climate, land forms, vegetation, soils, and water resources. Laboratory exercises stress the use and interpretation of maps and other graphic materials. Prerequisite: 3 credits in Geography or Geology.
  • GEP 227: Interpretation of Aerial Photography. 4 hours (2, lecture; 2, lab), 3 credits.
    Prerequisite: 3 credits in Geography or Geology.
  • GEP 228: Weather and Climate. 5 hours (3, lecture; 2, lab), 4 credits.
    Introductory study of elements of weather and climate: temperature, precipitation and humidity, and air pressure and winds. Training in the use of weather instruments to measure these phenomena. A study of modern weather theory. Forecasting from the daily weather map. A study of the climates of the world and their influences on native vegetation, soils, and human activities. Characteristics and use of climatological classifications. Prerequisite: 3 credits in Geography or Geology.
  • GEP 229: The Geography and Geology of Petroleum. 3 hours, 3 credits.
    World sources and distribution of petroleum and gas: origin, exploration, reserves, production, and use. Multinational petroleum corporations and the effect of governmental regulations, both international and national. Prerequisite: Either GEO 100, GEO 166 or 3 credits in Geography.
  • GEP 230: Urban Environmental Management. 3 hours, 3 credits.
    Basic issues and possible solutions to problems of the urban environment, including solid waste management, air and water quality, noise pollution, and open-space beautification. Course includes strategies for citizen participation and organization related to local environmental projects.
  • GEP 299: Cartography and Graphic Presentation II. 6 hours (2, lecture; 4, lab), 4 credits.
    Prerequisite: GEP 199.
  • GEP (BIO) 302: Biogeography. 5 hours (3, lecture; 2, lab), 4 credits.
    Prerequisite: GEP 226 and BIO 166-167.\
  • GEP 310: Geography of Urban Health. 4 hours, 3 credits (2, lecture; 2, lab).
    A geographical examination of urban health. Topics include the historical perspective of health, place, and society; mapping and measuring health and health impacts; the social and spatial patterning of health; the geography of health inequalities and disparities; health and social/spatial mobility; and the effects of urban segregation, overcrowding, and poverty on disease. Geographic Information Science will be used in the laboratory exercises to illustrate the theoretical concepts and to produce worked examples of health geography.
  • GEP 321: Introduction to Remote Sensing. (3, lecture; 2, lab), 4 credits.
    Fundamentals of remote sensing: energy interactions between the sun, atmosphere and features on the earth surface. Structure of raster data, cell size, and both passive and active remote sensing. Spatial, spectral, radiometric and temporal resolution characteristics of different multispectral remotely sensed data using specialized image analysis software.
  • GEP 350: Special Projects in Geographic Information Systems. 6 hours (2, lecture; 4, lab), 4 credits.
    May be reelected when topic changes, for a maximum of 8 credits. Special topics in the use of Geographic Information Systems for conducting research and spatial analysis in the natural and social sciences. The advanced use of computer mapping and spatial analysis for studying the physical and human components of the earth's environment. Prerequisite: GEP 199, GEP 205, or Departmental permission.
  • GEP 470: Seminar and Internship Program in Geography. 4 hours, 4 credits (may be requested for a total of 8 credits).
    Review of current professional issues in the practice of Geography, especially in the fields of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Environmental Geography, and Urban Geography, with weekly work as an intern in various organizations. Prerequisite: Departmental permission.

Earth Science:

  •  GEO 100: Marine Science. 5 hours (3, lecture; 2, lab), 4 credits.
    A survey of the geological, physical, chemical, and biological processes that shape the oceans.
  • GEO 101: Physical Geology. 5 hours (3, lecture; 2, lab), 4 credits.
    The scientific method in geology. Quantitative analysis and solution of representative geological problems. Introduction to the earth's physical and chemical processes. Plate tectonics. Major features of the continents and ocean basins and the processes that form and modify them. The rock cycle. Natural resources and the study of rocks, minerals, and maps. Optional field observations.
  • GEO 166: Processes of Global Change. 5 hours (3, lecture; 2, lab), 4 credits.
    Evolution of the planet Earth; global composition and circulation of earth's air, water, and rock systems, and their interaction with the biosphere. Earth science-based analysis of transnational and global environmental problems. Management of our energy, mineral, and material resources. Prerequisite: Completion of the College Requirement in Mathematics.
  •  GEO 167: Evolution of the Earth. 5 hours(3, lecture; 2, lab), 4 credits.
    Stages in the history of the earth. Origin of the earth, the ancient seas and their changing shorelines, the continents and mountains, and the evolution of life on earth as seen in the fossil record. Laboratory work includes the study of important rocks and fossils, the interpretation of geologic maps, and the construction sections and maps. Prerequisite: Completion of the College requirement in mathematics.
  •  GEO 231: Principles of Geomorphology. 4 hours (2, lecture; 2, lab), 3 credits.
    Systematic study of the face of the earth; the characteristics, distribution, classification, origin, and evolution of the earth's surface features. Laboratory work includes the study of topographic maps, models, slides, and photographs. Field experience. Prerequisite: GEO 100, GEO 101, GEO 166, or GEP 226.
  • GEO 236: Environmental Geology. 5 hours (3, lecture; 2, lab), 4 credits.
    The geologic aspects of land and ocean use. Geological nature and control of water, sand, gravel, building sites, and recreational areas. Geological factors in both exploitation and conservation of the environment. Prerequisite: GEO 100, GEO 101, GEO 166, or GEP 226.
  • GEO 242: Introductory Paleontology. 5 hours (3, lecture; 2, lab), 4 credits.
    The history of animals and plants over geologic time. Paleontology evolution and extinction of organisms as seen in the fossil record. Laboratory work, supplemented by field trips. Prerequisite: GEO 167 or BIO 167, or instructor's permission.
  •  GEO 244: Mineralogy. 6 hours (2, lecture; 4, lab), 4 credits.
     Introduction to crystallography, determinative mineralogy of rock-forming minerals. Mineral identification of hand specimens in the laboratory. Field experience. Prerequisite: GEO 100, 101, or 166.
  • GEO 245: Earth Materials. 5 hours (3, lecture; 2, lab), 4 credits.
    Presentation of the fundamentals of mineralogy and petrology (igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary) with a focus on common rock-forming minerals, crystal structure, mineral and rock identification, soil, and water within the context of biogeochemical cycles. Prerequisite: GEO 167, 166, or 101.
  •  GEO 303: Stratigraphy and Sedimentology. 6 hours (3, lecture; 3, lab), 4 credits.
    Techniques of physical and paleontologic correlation of rock sequences. Application of these techniques to basin analysis and construction of the geologic time scale. Modern classic and carbonate sedimentary environments, physical and chemical principles of sedimentation and paleoenvironmental analysis. Emphasis on the evolution of, and search for, water and hydrocarbon resources. Prerequisite: GEO 167 and GEO 244.
  •  GEO (BIO) 332: Advanced Oceanography. 5 hours, (2, lecture; 3, lab or seminar; several day-long research exercises), 3.5 credits.
    Prerequisite: GEO Major: GEO 100, either BIO 166 or BIO 167, and either CHE 114 or CHE 166-167. Prerequisite: BIO major: BIO 166-167, GEO 166 , and either CHE 114 or 166-167. Note: GEO (BIO) 332 may be credited toward either the GEO or the BIO major.
  •  GEO 333: Petrology. 5 hours (3, lecture; 2, lab), 4 credits.
    Prerequisite: GEO 244.
  •  GEO 340 Natural Hazards and Disasters: A Multidisciplinary Approach. 3 hours (3, lecture), 3 credits.
    Natural hazards and disasters: origin, physical and social implications. Elements of geographic, geological, social and political analysis applied to risk estimation and mitigation and management. Prerequisite: GEO 166 or GEO 101, plus the college mathematics requirement.
  • GEO 341: Natural Hazards and Disasters Laboratory. 2 hours, lab, 1 credit.
    Lab supplements GEO 340 with designed exercises, simulations and critical review and analysis of current and historic disasters. Students will use statistical methods, interactive mapping software and case studies to learn technical skills and gain insight into complexity of disaster modeling, management and mitigation. COREQ: GEO 340.
  • GEO 342: Micropaleontology. 5 hours (3, lecture; 2, lab), 4 credits.
    Prerequisite: Either GEO 167 or BIO 266.
  • GEO 344: Optical Mineralogy. 5 hours (2, lecture; 3, lab), 4 credits.
    Prerequisite: GEO 100 or 101, and GEO 244.
  • GEO 348: Structural Geology. 5 hours (3, lecture; 2, lab), 4 credits.
    The deformation of the earth's crust: mechanics of rock deformation. Concepts of stress and strain: behavior of rocks under stress. Results of experimental rock deformation, and their application to naturally deformed rocks. Description and analysis of large- and small-scale structures and the mechanisms that produce them. Selected regional examples. Laboratory studies include orthographic and stereographic projection techniques of problem-solving and work with maps and cross-sections. Field experience. Prerequisite: GEO 167 and plane geometry. RECOMMENDED: PHY 168.
  • GEO 375: Field Problems in Geology. 90 hours (fieldwork and lab), 3 credits.
    (Between spring and summer sessions.) One day of laboratory work and ten days of selected field problems in New York State, New England, New Jersey, or Pennsylvania. Areas will vary from year to year. Geologic maps will be made from topographic or air photo bases and will be supplemented by written reports on the individual areas. Prerequisite: Either GEO 167 or GEO 244. Note: For estimated costs and dates of registration and fieldwork, consult the Department Chair.
  •  GEO 401: X-ray Crystallography. 5 hours (3, lecture; 2, lab), 4 credits.
     Prerequisite: Either GEO or CHE majors.
  • GEO 410: Environmental Biogeochemistry. 5 hours (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab), 4 credits.
    In-depth study of environmental biogeochemical processes and issues, ranging from aquatic to terrestrial systems. Laboratory exercises designed to provide experience in national and transnational environmental analysis. Prerequisite: BIO 167, CHE 166, GEO 166, GEP 210, or Departmental permission.
  • GEO 426: Advanced Sedimentology. 3 hours, 3 credits.
    Prerequisite: GEO 100 or 101, GEO 244, and MAT 141 and 176.
  • GEO 440: Environmental Impact Assessment. 5 hours, 4 credits (3 hours, lecture: 2 hours, lab).
    Overview of assessment of environmental conditions ranging from degradation in air and water quality to noise and visual pollution due to anthropogenic and natural causes. Prerequisite: GEP 210 or Departmental permission.
  • GEO 448: Plate Tectonics. 5 hours (3, lecture; 2, lab), 4 credits.
    Plate Tectonics as a unifying theory: the driving mechanisms of crustal deformation. Evidence supporting sea-floor spreading and plate motions: geophysical and geologic data. Description and comparison of active and ancient tectonic belts. Implications of plate tectonics, continental drift, and mountain building, the role of plate tectonic cycle in renewal of Earth's surface, and relation with other biogeochemical cycles. Readings from original papers. Laboratories include geologic map study of older tectonic belts and techniques of measuring, plotting, and interpreting structural data of deformed rocks. Prerequisite: GEO 166 OR 101 AND 167.
  • GEO 450: Seminar. 2 hours, 2 credits; maximum, 4 credits.
    Major topics of current interest in geology. Topic and instructor will change each semester. Prerequisite: GEO 244 and one 300-level GEO course.
  • GEO (BIO) 470: Summer Oceanographic Research Cruise. 90 hours (fieldwork and lab), 3 credits.
    (Between spring and summer sessions.) Prerequisite: Either GEO (BIO) 332 or BIO 335. NOTE: Please consult either Department before registering for this course.
  • GEO 490: Honors in Geology. One semester; 2, 3, or 4 credits (may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits).
    Individual research, including reading and—in some cases—laboratory or field investigations, to be carried out under the individual guidance of a staff member. The results must be embodied in an honors essay or other suitable presentation. Prerequisite: Departmental permission.

 

 

Last modified: Jul 1, 2014

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