Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences

locke publications

John Locke

ARTICLES AND CHAPTERS
1. Locke, J. L., & Richards, A. L. (1966). Type V Bekesy audiograms in normal hearers. Journal of Auditory Research, 6, 393-395.
2. Locke, J. L. (1968). Questionable assumptions underlying articulation research. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 33, 112-116.
3. Locke, J. L. (1968). Oral perception and articulation learning. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 26, 1259-1264.
4. Locke, J. L. (1968). Discriminative learning in children’s acquisition of phonology. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 11, 428-434.
5. Locke, J. L. (1968). A methodological consideration in kinesthetic feedback research. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 11, 668-669.
6. Locke, J. L. (1969). Short-term auditory memory, oral perception, and experimental sound learning. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 12, 185-192.
7. Locke, J. L. (1969). Peer-group acceptance of children with disordered speech. Journal of the Wisconsin Speech and Hearing Association, 7, 5-6.
8. Locke, J. L. (1969). Experimentally-elicited articulatory behaviour. Language and Speech, 12, 187-191.
9. Maxwell, S., & Locke, J. L. (1969). Voice in myasthenia gravis. Laryngoscope, 79, 1902- 1906.
10. Locke, J. L. (1970). Short-term memory encoding strategies of the deaf. Psychonomic Science, 12, 233-234.
11. Locke, J. L. (1970). The value of repetition in articulation learning. International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teaching, 8, 147-153.
12. Locke, J. L., & Fehr, F. S. (1970). Subvocal rehearsal as a form of speech. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 9, 495-498.
13. Locke, J. L. (1970). Subvocal speech and speech. Asha, 12, 7-14.
14. Locke, J. L., & Fehr, F. S. (1970). Young children’s use of the speech code in a recall task. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 10, 367-373.
15. Hoglund, J., & Locke, J. L. (1970). Note on servo theory in children’s phonetic learning. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 31, 417-418.
16. Locke, J. L. (1970). Phonetic analysis of pronounceability. Psychological Reports, 27, 583- 587.
17. Locke, J. L. (1970). Acoustic vigilance behavior in four-year-old children. Psychonomic Science, 21, 111-112.
18. Locke, J. L. (1971). The child’s acquisition of phonetic behavior. Acta Symbolica, 2, 28-32.
19. Foley, H., & Locke, J. L. (1971). Young children’s knowledge of morphological and phonological rules. Journal of Communication Disorders, 4, 259-262.
20. Locke, J. L., & Locke, V. L. (1971). Deaf children’s phonetic, visual, and dactylic coding in a grapheme recall task. Journal of Experimental Psychology, 89, 142-146.
21. Locke, J. L., & Goldstein, J. (1971). Children’s identification and discrimination of phonemes. British Journal of Disorders of Communication, 6, 107-112.
22. Locke, J. L. (1971). Phoneme perception in two- and three-year-old children. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 32, 215-217.
23. Locke, J. L. (1971). Phonetic mediation in four-year-old children. Psychonomic Science, 23, 409.
24. Locke, J. L., & Locke, V. L. (1971). Recall of phonetically and semantically similar words by three-year-old children. Psychonomic Science, 24, 189-190.
25. Locke, J. L. (1971). Phonemic processing in silent reading. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 32, 905-906.
26. Locke, J. L. (1971). Acoustic imagery in children’s phonetically mediated recall. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 32, 1000-1002.
27. Locke, J. L., & Fehr, F. S. (1971). Phonetic correlates of graphic recall. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 33, 1040-1042.
28. Locke, J. L. (1972). Ease of articulation. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 15, 194-200.
29. Goldstein, J. I., Locke, J. L., & Fehr, F. S. (1972). Children’s pre-recall phonetic processing of pictures and printed words. Psychonomic Science, 26, 314-316.
30. Locke, J. L., & Fehr, F. S. (1972). Subvocalization of heard or seen words prior to spoken or written recall. American Journal of Psychology, 85, 63-68.
31. Locke, J. L., & Goldstein, J. (1973). Children’s attention and articulation. Language and Speech, 16, 156-168.
32. Locke, J. L. (1973). Children’s language coding in short-term memory. Language and Speech, 16, 271-278.
33. Locke, J. L., & Bookshester, J. (1973). Children’s phonetic learning in the laboratory: judgmental or real? Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 16, 667-670.
34. Locke, J. L., & Kutz, K. (1975). Memory for speech and speech for memory. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 18, 176-191.
35. Locke, J. L., & Ginsburg, M. (1975). Electromyography and lipreading in the detection of verbal rehearsal. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society, 5, 246-248.
36. Locke, J. L., & Fehr, F. S. (1975). Electromyographic studies of subvocal rehearsal in learning. In Karrer, R. (Ed.), Developmental psychophysiology of mental retardation: concepts and studies. Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas.
37. Locke, J. L. (1977). Some precautions in the identification of central auditory processing disorders and other flying objects. The Illinois Speech and Hearing Journal, 11, 14-16.
38. Locke, J. L. (1978). Large auditory and small visual effects in the recall of consonant letters. American Journal of Psychology, 91, 89-92.
39. Locke, J. L., & Deck, J. (1978). Retrieval failure, rehearsal deficiency and short-term memory loss in the aphasic adult. Brain and Language, 5, 227-235.
40. Locke, J. L. (1978). Phonemic effects in the silent reading of hearing and deaf children. Cognition, 6, 175-189.
41. Locke, J. L. (1978). Selective loss of phonetic production and perception: an index to the child’s acquisition of phonology. Journal of the National Student Speech and Hearing Association, 6, 3-11.
42. Locke, J. L. (1979). The child’s processing of phonology. In Collins, W. A. (Ed.), The Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology, Volume 12. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
43. Locke, J. L., & Scott, K. (1979). Phonetically mediated recall in the phonetically disordered child. Journal of Communication Disorders, 12, 125-131.
44. Locke, J. L. (1979). Homonymy and sound change in the child’s acquisition of phonology. In Lass, N. (Ed.), Speech and language: research and theory. Volume 2. New York: Academic Press.
45. Locke, J. L. (1980). Levels of speech perception analysis. In Wolfe, W. D., & Goulding, D. J. (Eds.), Articulation and learning (2nd Edition). Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas.
46. Locke, J. L. (1980). The prediction of child speech errors: implications for a theory of acquisition. In Yeni-Komshian, G., Kavanagh, J. F., & Ferguson, C. (Eds), Child phonology. Volume 2. Production. New York: Academic Press.
47. Locke, J. L. (1980). The inference of phoneme perception in the phonologically disordered child. Part I. A rationale, some criteria, the conventional tests. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 45, 431-444.
48. Locke, J. L. (1980). The inference of phoneme perception in the phonologically disordered child. Part II. Clinically novel procedures, their use, some findings. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 45, 445-468.
49. Locke, J. L. (1980). Mechanisms of phonological development in children: maintenance, learning and loss. Papers from the Sixteenth Regional Meeting of the Chicago Linguistic Society, 220-238.
50. Locke, J. L. (1981). Phonological structure: evidence from the child. University of Maryland Working Papers in Biocommunication,1, 29-42.
51. Locke, J. L., & Yakov, D. H. (1982). Speech as perception: some contextual effects on phonological segments. Seminars in Speech, Language and Hearing, 3, 162-171.
52. Locke, J. L., & Deck, J. (1982). The processing of printed language by aphasic adults: some phonological and syntactic effects. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 25, 314-319.
53. Locke, J. L. (1983). Treatment of speech perception problems. In Perkins, W. H. (Ed.), Current therapy of communication disorders. New York: Thieme-Stratton.
54. Locke, J. L. (1983). Clinical phonology: the explanation and treatment of speech sound disorders. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 48, 339-341.
55. Locke, J. L. (1985). The role of phonetic factors in parent reference. Journal of Child Language, 12, 215-220.
56. Locke, J. L. (1985). Epigenetic paths to phonological disorders. In Children’s phonological disorders: pathways and patterns. Rockville, MD: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
57. Locke, J. L. (1986). Speech perception and the emergent lexicon: an ethological approach. In Fletcher, P., & Garman, M. (Eds.), Language acquisition II. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
58. Locke, J. L. (1986). The linguistic significance of babbling. In Lindblom, B., & Zetterstrom, R. (Eds.), Precursors of early speech. Wenner-Gren International Symposium Series, Volume 44. New York: Stockton Press.
59. Zagar, L., & Locke, J. L. (1986). The psychological reality of phonetic features in children. Language, Speech and Hearing Services in Schools, 17, 56-62.
60. Locke, J. L. (1988). The sound shape of early lexical representations. In Smith, M. D., & Locke, J. L. (Eds.), The emergent lexicon: the child’s development of a linguistic vocabulary. New York: Academic Press.
61. Locke, J. L. (1988). Variation in human biology and child phonology: a response to Goad and Ingram. Journal of Child Language, 15, 663-668.
62. Locke, J. L. (1989). Babbling and early speech: continuity and individual differences. First Language, 9, 191-206.
63. Locke, J. L., & Mather, P. L. (1989). Genetic factors in the ontogeny of spoken language: evidence from monozygotic and dizygotic twins. Journal of Child Language, 16, 553-559.
64. Velleman, S., Mangipudi, L., & Locke, J. L. (1989). Prelinguistic phonetic contingency: data from Down syndrome. First Language, 9, 159-174.
65. Locke, J. L., & Pearson, D. M. (1990). Linguistic significance of babbling: evidence from a tracheostomized infant. Journal of Child Language, 17, 1-16.
66. Locke, J. L. (1990). Structure and stimulation in the ontogeny of spoken language. Developmental Psychobiology, 23, 621-644.
67. Locke, J. L. (1990). Cranking up the capacity for spoken language. Developmental Psychobiology, 23, 757-758.
68. Locke, J. L. (1990). “Mama” and “papa” in child language: parent reference or phonetic preference? In Metuzale-Kangere, B., & Rinholm, H. D. (Eds.), Symposium Balticum: a Festschrift to honour Professor Velta Ruke-Dravina. Hamburg: Helmut Buske Verlag.
69. Locke, J. L., & Pearson, D. M. (1992). Vocal learning and the emergence of phonological capacity: a neurobiological approach. In Ferguson, C., Menn, L., & Stoel-Gammon, C. (Eds.), Phonological development: models, research, implications. Parkton, MD: York Press.
70. Locke, J. L. (1992). The biology of spoken language: thirty years of research on developmental neurolinguistics. Pediatric Neurology, 8, 245-250.
71. Locke, J. L. (1992). Neural specializations for language: a developmental perspective. Seminars in the Neurosciences, 4, 425-431.
72. Locke, J. L. (1993). Learning to speak. Journal of Phonetics, 21, 141-146.
73. Locke, J. L. (1993). The role of the face in vocal learning and the development of spoken language. In de Boysson-Bardies, B., de Schonen, S., Jusczyk, P., MacNeilage, P., & Morton, J. (Eds.), Developmental neurocognition: speech and face processing in the first year of life. The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
74. Locke, J. L. (1994). The biological building blocks of spoken language. In Hogan, J., & Bolhuis, J. (Eds.), Causal mechanisms of behavioural development. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
75. Locke, J. L. (1994). Phases in the development of linguistic capacity. In Gajdusek, D. C., McKhann, G. M., & Bolis, C. L. (Eds.), Evolution and Neurology of Language. Discussions in Neuroscience, Volume 10. Amsterdam: Elsevier.
76. Locke, J. L. (1994). Gradual emergence of developmental language disorders. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 37, 608-616.
77. Locke, J. L. (1994). Phases in the child’s development of language. American Scientist, 82, 436-445.
78. Locke, J. L. (1994). Developmental paths to phonology. In Williams, E. J., & Langsam, J. (Eds.), Children’s phonological disorders: pathways and patterns. Rockville, MD: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
79. Locke, J. L. (1994). Development of the capacity for spoken language. In Fletcher, P., & MacWhinney, B. (Ed.), Handbook of child language. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers.
80. Locke, J. L. (1995). More than words can say. New Scientist, March 18, 30-33.
81. Locke, J. L. (1995). Linguistic capacity: an ontogenetic theory with evolutionary implications. In Zimmerman, E., Newman, J., & Jurgens, U. (Eds.), Current topics in primate vocal communication. New York: Plenum Publishing Corporation.
82. Locke, J. L., Bekken, K. E., McMinn-Larson, L., & Wein, D. (1995). Emergent control of manual and vocal-motor activity in relation to the development of speech. Brain and Language, 51, 498-508.
83. Locke, J. L., Lambrecht-Smith, S., Roberts, J., & Guttentag, C. (1995). Phonetic development of infants at risk for developmental dyslexia. In Powell, T. W. (Ed.), Pathologies of speech and language: contributions of clinical phonetics and linguistics. International Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics Association.
84. Locke, J. L. (1996). Why do infants begin to talk? Language as an unintended consequence, Journal of Child Language, 23, 251-268.
85. Macaruso, P., Locke, J. L., Smith, S., & Powers, S. (1996). Short-term memory and phonological coding in developmental dyslexia. Journal of Neurolinguistics, 9, 135-146.
86. Locke, J. L., & Snow, C. E. (1997). Social influences on vocal learning in human and nonhuman primates. In Snowdon, C., & Hausberger, M. (Eds.), Social influences on vocal development. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
87. Locke, J. L. (1997). A theory of neurolinguistic development. Brain and Language, 58, 265- 326.
88. Locke, J. L. (1997). Degrees of linguistic freedom: response to Landau. In Lewis, V., & Collis, G. M. (Eds.), Blindness and psychological development in young children. Leicester: British Psychological Society.
89. Locke, J. L., Hodgson, J., Macaruso, P., Roberts, J., Lambrecht-Smith, S., & Guttentag, C. (1997). The development of developmental dyslexia. In Hulme, C., & Snowling, M. (Eds.), Dyslexia: biological bases, identification and intervention. London: Whurr Publishers.
90. Locke, J. L. (1998). Are developmental language disorders primarily grammatical? Speculations from an evolutionary model. In Paul, R. (Ed.), Exploring the speech-language connection. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.
91. Locke, J. L. (1998). Social sound-making as a precursor to spoken language. In Hurford, J. R., Studdert-Kennedy, M., & Knight, C. (Eds.), Approaches to the evolution of language: social and cognitive bases. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
92. Locke, J. L. (1998). Early developmental delay: problems for the theorist. In von Euler, C., Lundberg, I., & Llinas, R. (Eds.), Basic mechanisms in cognition and language. With special reference to phonological problems in dyslexia. Wenner-Gren International Series, Volume 70. Amsterdam: Elsevier Science.
93. Locke, J. L. (1998). Where did all the gossip go? Casual conversation in the information age. Asha, 40, 26-31.
94. Locke, J. L. (1999). No talking in the corridors of science. American Scientist, 87, 8-9.
95. Locke, J. L. (1999). Towards a biological science of language development. In Barrett, M. (Ed.), The development of language. Hove (East Sussex), UK: Psychology Press.
96. Locke, J. L. (1999). Language development and brain development. In Fabbro, F. (Ed.), Concise encyclopedia of language pathology. Oxford: Elsevier Science.
97. Locke, J. L., & Hauser, M. D. (1999). Sex and status effects on primate volubility: clues to the origin of vocal languages? Evolution and Human Behavior, 20, 151-158.
98. Locke, J. L., & Macaruso, P. (1999). Handedness in developmental dyslexia: direct observation of a thousand subjects. Journal of Neurolinguistics, 12, 147-156.
99. Locke, J. L. (2000). Kuala Lumpur syndrome: personal, social, and political effects of communication technologies. Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research, 21-28.
100. Locke, J. L. (2000). Movement patterns in spoken language. Science, 288, 449-450
101. Locke, J. L. (2001). Rank and relationships in the evolution of spoken language. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, 7, 37-50.
102. Locke, J. L. (2001). First communion: the emergence of vocal relationships. Social Development, 10, 294-308.
103. Locke, J. L. (2001). The treatment of language disordered children: a potentially helpful theory. ACQ: The Journal of Speech Pathology Australia, 3, 3-6.
104. Locke, J. L. (2001). The benefits of babbling in the infant and the species: from sound- making to speech. In Hewlett, N., Kelly, L., & Windsor, F. (Eds.), Themes in clinical linguistics and phonetics. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
105. Locke, J. L. (2002). Dancing with humans: interaction as unintended consequence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 25, 632-633.
106. Locke, J. L. (2004). How do infants come to control the organs of speech? In Maassen, B., Kent, R. D., Peters, H. F. M., van Lieshout, P. H. H. M., & Hulstijn, W. (Eds.). Speech motor control in normal and disordered speech. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
107. Locke, J. L. (2004). Trickle up phonetics: a vocal role for the infant. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 27, 516.
108. Locke, J. L. (2005). Looking for, looking at: social control, honest signals, and intimate experience in human evolution and history. In McGregor, P. K. (Ed.) Animal communication networks. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
109. Locke, J. L. (2005). Language and life: the role of development in evolution. ASHA Leader, August.
110. Locke, J. L. (2006). Interaction of developmental and evolutionary processes in the emergence of spoken language. In Cangelosi, A., Smith, A. D. M., & Smith, K. (Eds.), The evolution of language: proceedings of the 6th international conference. Hackensack, NJ: World Scientific Publishing.
111. Locke, J. L. (2006). Parental selection of vocal behavior: crying, cooing, babbling and the evolution of spoken language. Human Nature, 17, 155-168.
112. Locke, J. L., & Bogin, B. (2006). Language and life history: a new perspective on the evolution and development of linguistic communication. Behavioral and Brain Science, 29, 259-325.
113. Smith, A. B., Roberts, J., Lambrecht Smith, S. L., Locke, J. L., & Bennett, J. (2006). Reduced speaking rate as an early predictor of reading disability. American Journal of Speech- Language Pathology, 15, 289-297.
114. Locke, J. L. (2006). The evolution and development of spoken language. In McLeod, S. (Ed.), The international guide to speech acquisition. Clifton Park, NY: Thompson Delmar Learning.
115. Locke, J. L. (2007). Bimodal signaling in infancy: motor behavior, reference, and the evolution of spoken language. Interaction Studies, 8, 159-175.
116. Locke, J. L. (2007). Language. In Sica, D. (Ed.), The Language of Science. Monza: Polimetrica. http://www.polimetrica.eu/site/?p=129
117. Locke, J. L. (2007). Vocal innovation. Behavioral and Bain Sciences, 30, 415-416. 118. Locke, J. L. (2008). The trait of human language: lessons from the canal boat children of
England. Biology & Philosophy, 23, 347-361. 119. Locke, J. L. (2008). Cost and complexity: selection for speech and language. Journal of
Theoretical Biology, 251, 640-652.
120. Locke, J. L. (2008). Lipsmacking and babbling: syllables, sociality, and survival. In Davis, B. L., & Zajdo, K. (Eds.), The syllable in speech production: perspectives on the frame content theory. Taylor & Francis.
121. Smith, A. B., Locke, J. L., & Farkas, L. (2008). Precursors of dyslexia in early conversational turn exchange. Topics in Language Disorders, 28, 5-14.
122. Locke, J. L. (2009). Evolutionary developmental linguistics: naturalization of the faculty of language. Language Sciences, 31, 33-59.
123. Lambrecht Smith, S., Scott, K. A., Roberts, J., & Locke, J. L. (2008). Disabled readers’ performance on tasks of phonological processing, rapid naming and letter knowledge before and after kindergarten. Learning Disabilities Research & Practice, 23, 113-124.
124. Smith, A. B., Lambrecht Smith, S., Locke, J. L., & Bennett, J. (2008). A longitudinal study of speech timing in young children later found to have reading disability. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 51, 1300-1314.
125. Progovac, L., & Locke, J. L. (2009). Exocentric compounds, ritual insult, and the evolution of syntax. Biolinguistics, 3, 337-354.
126. Locke, J. L. (2009). Why we talk: The evolutionary origins of language, by Jean-Louis Dessalles. Language, 85, 29-32.
127. Locke, J. L. (2010). The development of linguistic systems: insights from evolution. In Guendouzi, J., Loncke, F., & Williams, M. J. (Eds.), Handbook of psycholinguistic and cognitive processes: perspectives in communication disorders. Taylor & Francis.
128. Locke, J. L. (in press). Vocal and verbal complexity: a fitness account of language, situated in development. In Tallerman, M., & Gibson, K. (Eds.), Oxford Handbook on Language Evolution. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
129. Lambrecht Smith, S., Roberts, J. A., Locke, J. L., & Tozer, R. (in press). An exploratory study of the development of early syllable structure in reading-impaired children. Journal of Reading Disabilities.
130. Lambrecht Smith, S., Scott, K. A., Roberts, J., & Locke, J. L. (in press). Disabled readers’ performance on tasks of phonological processing, rapid naming and letter knowledge before and after kindergarten: a cautionary tale. Learning Disabilities Research & Practice.

BOOKS
1. Locke, J. L. (1983). Phonological acquisition and change. New York: Academic Press. With a foreword by Michael Studdert-Kennedy.
2. Smith, M. D., & Locke, J. L. (Eds.) (1988). The emergent lexicon: the child’s development of a linguistic vocabulary. New York: Academic Press.
3. Locke, J. L. (1993). The child’s path to spoken language. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
4. Locke, J. L. (1998). The de-voicing of society: why we don’t talk to each other anymore. New York: Simon & Schuster.
5. Locke, J. L. (2010). Eavesdropping: an intimate history. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
6. Locke, J.L. (in press). Duels & duets: why men and women talk so differently. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

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